Kirabo in 60 Seconds
Kirabo in 60 Seconds
"God has opened my way"
"God has opened my way"
The Difference
The Difference
We're still here
We're still here
You Could
You Could
Changing Worlds
Changing Worlds
Akwero Phiona: A Kirabo Story
Akwero Phiona: A Kirabo Story
Amono Racheal: A Kirabo Story
Amono Racheal: A Kirabo Story
Mukyala Racheal: A Kirabo Story
Mukyala Racheal: A Kirabo Story
Kiwago Gonza: A Kirabo Story
Kiwago Gonza: A Kirabo Story
Julius: A Kirabo Story
Julius: A Kirabo Story
Nabatanzi Barabara: A Kirabo Story
Nabatanzi Barabara: A Kirabo Story
Kamoga Alan: A Kirabo Story
Kamoga Alan: A Kirabo Story
Kirabo in 60 SecondsUganda is a nation full of challenges and potential. Watch this short clip to see what they're up against and how Kirabo and you can help shape the future of a nation.Since 2001, the Kirabo Foundation has been providing scholarships and support to orphaned and disadvantaged children of Uganda.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
"God has opened my way"Five students tell their Kirabo stories in their own words.Since 2001, KiraboFoundation.org has been providing scholarships and support to orphaned and disadvantaged children of Uganda.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
The DifferenceAs we sped through the abandoned streets of late night Entebbe all was quiet. We unloaded our bags and settled into our guest rooms under the light of a single, bare fluorescent bulb as geckos harvested insects from the plaster expanse of ceiling. My first few hours in Uganda had revealed little. As I drifted off to sleep Africa was still a dark and blurry shape tainted by stories of genocide and disease.Dawn, however, greeted me with a spectacular explosion of purples, pinks and greens. A refreshingly cool breeze blew from Lake Victoria as buzzing motorbikes, children, roosters, goats and taxis filled the air with sound. I had never seen a place that was more living, more moving.And so began our week. A whirlwind tour of faces and places. Music, smiles, friendly greetings and gentle handshakes greeted us everywhere. Crisp white shirts and creased dress slacks emerged from mud huts as leaves and debris where quickly brushed from humble lawns each morning.But underneath the warm optimism and organic order was the quiet desperation of a people who had not forgotten their harrowed past. Who still labored under the burden of poverty. Who still desperately hoped for something better. The feeling of need was as penetrating as the tropical sun. Eyes dimmed ever so slightly as the realization came over our hosts that we could not help everyone, that our resources were limited.The more we traveled the mud roads and rutted highways the more the magnitude of the situation settled in. The Kirabo Foundation currently sponsors around forty students. In a country with 1.7 million orphans, we help .0000235% of them. I was overwhelmed.As the week went on, however, I experienced a paradigm shift. The ocean of need that initially dwarfed our efforts began to magnify them. Sure, we may not singlehandedly change Uganda. But we are changing Ugandan lives. We are replacing desperation with hope, futility with opportunity.Browse our site, watch our videos. Look into the eyes of our kids. Hear their stories, share their joy, feel their pain. Be overwhelmed. In the end you won’t be able to change the world either. But you can change theirs.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
We're still hereOur first day of shooting started with a visit with a story book Ugandan family. Neatly trimmed gardens intertwined between well tended huts nestled on a jungled hill side. The family was gracious and warm and it looked to be the beginnings of a magical week. Just before we left however, the oldest boy requested a picture with his father. We navigated the clay path through the thick tropical foliage to the spot where his father had been resting for the past year. He knelt down by the headstone and smiled a smile that was slightly tinged. I was overwhelmed.As we stood quietly his siblings came in behind us and began cleaning the graves. Kneeling in the dirt they worked intently . The giggles and laughter of the morning were gone. I pointed “who is this one?” He replied “my sister.” And this one?” “My brother.” I continued to point at all of the eight mounds, “my brother’s son, my other sister.” The list went on.It is strange to be a 35 year old man standing next to a 13 year old that knows more about the ultimate reality of this life than I do. In terms of grasping mortality he is my elder. His fresh optimistic face hides memories that I can only imagine. The feverish crying of a sister, the worried, reddened eyes of a mother, another walk down the clay path, shovel in hand.This is Uganda. A warm beauty blanketing a deep sorrow. An immeasurable resilience, a capacity for joy in the most difficult of realities.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
You CouldOur lives are often less impactful than they could be because we underestimate the value of humble persistent effort. Popular culture looks to the superstars to save the day. The entertainers, the philanthropers. But, the fact of the matter is that the needs of the world are, for the most part, met by average people. People like you. People who say, "sure, I can't help everyone, but I can help someone, and I will."Music By: Bromeliad Music vimeo.com/bromeliadmusicFind out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org/
Changing WorldsThe Kirabo Foundation was unofficially founded in 2000 when Mindy Burgin spent three months in Jinja, Uganda, as a volunteer in a local orphanage. While there, she met Pastor Stephen Kudhongonia, who had been an orphan himself and dreamed of helping local orphans achieve an education. By the time Mindy returned home, she and a few family members were sponsoring seven students—a number that grew to 20 by 2004, when Mindy filed for non-profit status and Kirabo was born.Above is the story of Sebaduka Timothy, one of our very first students.Music by vimeo.com/bromeliadmusicFind out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Akwero Phiona: A Kirabo StoryPhiona talks about her experience with the Kirabo Foundation and shares why she thinks it's a great investment.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Amono Racheal: A Kirabo StoryWe had a chance to visit with a family of three long term Kirabo Students this past July. Like many Ugandan families they have been without a living parent for a number of years. Child led households face countless challenges in regards to meeting their daily needs. In the day-to-day struggle to survive long terms goals such as education fall by the wayside.This is where Kirabo comes in. With full educational scholarships many of these problems are addressed. In addition to academics the children are provided with room, board, clothing and positive adult role models in an environment that protects them from abuse and unhealthy relationships.Watch and listen as one of these siblings, Rachel, shares her story and tells how Kirabo has enabled her to succeed in a tremendous way.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Mukyala Racheal: A Kirabo StoryRacheal has now graduated from the program and she talks about her job as a nurse in an AIDS clinic and how Kirabo has opened doors of opportunity for her.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Kiwago Gonza: A Kirabo StoryI was in a meeting in the Ugandan countryside when Gonza pulled up. He had bicycled about 15 km of rutted trails to be there. He wanted support for school. This was one of dozen’s of such request I have received while in Uganda (most of which I am unable to assist). I asked him to write down his story and bring it back the next night.Over the next several interactions I learned that Gonza was a remarkable person. A person who is tenacious, resourceful and persistent. But even more than that he is a person with a sense of loyalty and compassion. His request was not just for him. It was his for his sister as well.A request for two was less likely to be granted than petition for one (a fact he undoubtedly was aware of). It would have been easy for him to secure his own scholarship before bringing little sister into the picture. But he didn’t. He made the tough choice to jeopardize his needs and wants for the sake of someone even less fortunate than he.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Julius: A Kirabo StoryI don’t remember when I first met this person. And when I say I don’t remember, I mean he made no initial impression on me. He is one of those people who just kind of blends in. One of those people who gets lost in the shuffle, who gets pushed aside by the jostling of the ambitious and the charismatic. Whose inner dignity and intelligence go unrealized because time and opportunity do not allow their true selves to be revealed. Circumstances conspire against them. A father dies. A mother has no means to provide. If there is no one to step in, a life simply fades off into the streets, one of the countless unnamed faces of poverty.The person I have just described to you could have been Julius. Watching his interview you will no doubt be impressed by his substance and potential. You also will see how terribly close he came to the edge. And how through the generosity of just one or two people his life story has been rewritten.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Nabatanzi Barabara: A Kirabo StoryMy name is Nabatanzi Barbara. I was born in 1988 in a family of five and am the fourth born. I have two sisters and two brothers.I studied my primary education from Jinja S.D.A. primary school. My father died when I was in primary three in 1996 and it was a very hard time for to study because I had remained with only my grandmother and mother who were both jobless. My mother and grandmother struggled to look for money to educate me so I studied and finished my primary seven, but when I finished there was not money for me to advance to senior one.On a Sabbath in 2001, grandmum talked to pastor Kudhongania about my situation and about how discouraged I was about being left behind by my friends who were advancing. When Pastor Kudhongonia heard my story from grandmum, he told her about Kirabo Foundation and registered me to join.When grand mum told me about it I was so happy because I knew I was going for my secondary education, so through Kirabo Foundation I went to Bugema Adventist School and managed to obtain my Uganda Certificate of Education. With further assistance from Kirabo Foundation I am now pursuing a bachelor’s degree in social work and community development and am in my final year at Kyambogo University.I enjoy helping those in difficult circumstances and my experience as an orphan enables me to understand what they are going through.I thank Kirabo Foundation because it brought back happiness to my life and also thank Pastor Kudhongonia. If it wasn’t for Kirabo I really don’t know where I would be. I always pray for Kirabo and the people who run the organization.The Foundation has been a helping hand to me. Thank you.I remain Nabtanzi Barbara.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
Kamoga Alan: A Kirabo StoryWatch Alan's heart touching story as he speaks of the loss of his mother and the new hope he found as part of the Kirabo Foundation.Find out more about Kirabo at kirabofoundation.org
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